How I Treat Motion Sickness

I can’t sit in a car anymore without getting at least slightly dizzy, unless I’m the driver. Every mode of transportaron that moves gets me dizzy or sick. I don’t know when it started happening. I didn’t get sick at all in SE Asia on all my crazy bus rides but once I arrived in South America on my RTW, it started happening. The worst was in Peru cutting through the Andes. I thought I was going to die.

It sucks because I love to travel but I hate having to get from one place to another. The saying that it’s all about the journey and not on arriving does not apply to me. All I want to do is skip the ride and just arrive.

I’m not sure what it is and I have yet to see a doctor about it but for now I’ve figured out ways to treat it to avoid getting sick.

China Train

Trains

On trains and subways I have to make sure I face the direction in which the train is moving in. I prefer window seat so I can look out the window. I don’t get sick on trains because trains allow me to move around and I like the feeling of having space.

Buses

Almost all bus rides will make me dizzy or sick. Unless the road is perfectly straight the entire time, I’m bound to feel it. Again, I prefer window seats but also water and snacks.

TV’s on buses are my worst nightmare. They are impossible to avoid unless I close my eyes or look out the window for as much as possible. Watching TV on buses makes me feel incredibly sick.

Mike On Train

Boats

If you’ve read my story about my trip in Fiji or Galapagos on being sea-sick than you’ve probably guessed that traveling by boat is a living hell for me. This takes the most preparation than any other mode of transportation. For Galapagos I had to pack a number of different motion sickness pills. I prefer non-drowsy because the drowsy version makes me sleepy. I’ve been told that if you take motion sickness pills a few days before and take them regularly (once every 12 hours) before the boat trip, then you’ll be less likely to be sick. I’ve tried this and it seemed to have worked.

Sitting in the very back of the boat is less bumpy than the front so I’m usually seated there.

Flying

I usually don’t feel too sick when I fly even on small planes. I can do most things like watch movies. If the ride is too bumpy, I might feel a tiny bit dizzy. When I do feel dizzy, it’s mostly because of a movie so I just shut it off and I start to feel better quickly after.

Other things I do

If I’m about to feel sick or I know it’s going to be a long bumpy ride, I almost always put on my headphones to some chill-out music. Once I know I’m going to be sick, I start to get nervous which makes things worse. Music tends to calm me down and takes my mind off of it. Everyone I’ve talked to easily gets motion sick has said music is the best treatment. Highly recommend this.

I’m getting into the habit of always carrying water. Dehydration has been the cause of more trouble. Eating is another thing I need to watch out for. I tend to go for something light.

Motion relief pressure point bands feel really weird and uncomfortable. I try to avoid these but still pack them just incase.

[question]Do you get motion sick? How do you treat it? Any tips to add?[/question]

Michael Tieso

Michael Tieso travels around the world writing, photographing, and filming his adventures. He is the Editor-in-chief of Art of Adventuring.

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