Art of Adventuring

How Minimalism Has Helped Me Become a Better Backpacker

Here’s a list of ways how becoming a minimalist has helped me become a better backpacker.

Smaller Backpack

I don’t need as much. My backpack is a 55L Eagle Creek Explorer LT. It has so far survived two years on the road and it’s still going strong. My back is not breaking because it’s light and easy to put on. In many airlines, it’s enough to even take as a carry-on. It’s easy to strap on and go.

What I took RTW

Saves Money

Since my backpack is small, I can’t carry much. I’m forced to buy less. It really makes me think twice about what I’m buying. This wasn’t ever an issue since I became a minimalist before I was a backpacker.

To me it feels good to own less. The less I own, the better I feel. I’m usually not tempted to buy too much. I’ve bought souvenirs as a personal remembrance of some places but they are always small and sometimes they were free. I don’t need anything fancy. I’m spending the money on experiences rather than material goods.

Less to deal with at home

I don’t need to rent a storage house. In fact, all I have is a small box that is kept at my mother’s house. I’ve sold all my possessions prior to traveling. Just like my last

I have nothing holding me back

I can travel for as long as I want. I have, as many Americans do, student loans – other than that, I don’t have to pay for anything else. I’m free to backpack for as long as I’d like without worrying about delaying anything back at home. I’ve met many backpackers that unwillingly need to go back home because of all the “stuff” they have back at home.

Appreciating the small things

Not owning anything outside of a backpack and a box makes me appreciate the little things in my life. What I own means a lot to me.