Art of Adventuring

How I Sold It All to Travel the World

It was three years ago when I had moved into a brand new apartment after signing a one year lease. After about three months and several bills, I wanted out and to travel the world. In only three months, I had a fully furnished apartment with a 57inch projection TV, 32inch LCD in the bedroom, Xbox, Wii, couches, tables, chairs, a DJ booth (hobby of mine), and so much more. This created some difficulties that I briefly wrote about in another article on how I left the corporate world.

I wanted a complete turnaround in my life and go completely minimalist. At first I thought selling everything was going to be difficult. I had a lot of junk. Perhaps too much for how old I was at the time (23). Luckily I was wrong. It was actually too easy. I would salvage every little tiny piece in the apartment in attempts to sell it. People really do buy just about anything.

I don’t have the exact numbers of how much this made me but it was something around $3,000. It took me approximately six months to sell everything. The only reason it took so long was because I still had to live with a some of my items till the last few months.

These are the resources I used to save a large amount of cash to travel the world:

For Sale Portobello Mkt by jjay69, on Flickr

Craigslist

If you’re in the United States, this is a gold mine. Everything can be sold here. I was lucky enough to live 5 minutes from New York City and most of my buyers came from that area. I had one buyer come to buy a cheap computer case and I asked him if he was interested in buying anything else in the apartment, he sees a hair dryer and I make an extra $20. Favorite part about Craigslist is that shipping is not needed. All my buyers came directly to my apartment. If I felt uneasy about the customer, I’d meet him in the apartment lobby. I found most people want to bargain and I expected that so I would usually mark the price up a little higher then bargain down for enough room. When it came closer to leaving the apartment, I marked some items way low so I could just get rid of them. Nearly everything sold.

Amazon

Video games, movies, television box sets, and books were all sold on Amazon. They actually sold quicker than I could get to the post office. Every day I was shipping more items. The commission Amazon takes adds up but since all the items were useless to me anyway, it was all profit regardless. What’s great about Amazon is you don’t have to write a description on what the product is, they just need the barcode ISDN number then you write the condition. Everything sold easily and really quickly. I was making daily post office visits and sometimes sending multiple amount of stuff.

Friends

I had a few things my friends wanted. I may have been able to sell them on Amazon or Craigslist but it was easier and less of a hassle to see if my friends wanted anything first. Some things I gave for free and others I sold at a low price. It was mostly random things around the house like kitchen items. It’s also a nice thing to do and helping out both parties.

Garage Sale Sign by Chiot's Run, on Flickr

Message Boards / Communities / Facebook

I’m heavily involved with the DJ music scene in New York City. I’m a frequent member in several message boards. This was where I went to sell most of my DJ equipment. A few Facebook status updates also helped pass the word around. Not as big of a profit but it helped.

Donating Clothes

I did not sell my clothes. I gave several trash bags full of clothing to charity. It was exciting because so many of my clothes were years old and I was simply sick of having them. I needed something new and refreshing.

Did you sell everything? What resources did you use?